Our First Aid…Comfort Kits

The other day I mentioned our family’s first aid kit and thought I would spend some time writing about them. I like to think of them more as a “Comfort Kit”.

Ours are unique and put together to meet everyone’s needs just as every family is unique. Spending some time now thinking about how and where you might need to use it will be very helpful when you really need it later. Our family has several designed for where they might be used.

Keep in mind the local hospital is only 15 minutes away and our kits are designed for minor injuries and illness such as the middle of the night when the stores are closed and someone has a cough or stomach ache. For anything beyond this we have 911 services or hop in the car. I at some point will rethink this a bit for the time when we won’t have 911 or some other unexpected situation arises. Who knows in this day and age. But I don’t expect to be stranded for days in a remote place on top of a mountain in the middle of winter or in the middle of a desert. We don’t travel far from home or off the beaten path so to say. We have cell phones and AAA services.

I think it’s important before you put one together to take a basic first aid course and be familiar how to treat minor injuries and illness. Take the time to read the entire label on the over the counter medications every time before you use it. After you have done the “doctoring” so to say for your family you will have a better idea what items work best for you and your family. I had a generic kit I bought when I was a new mother and wife. I never did use much of what was in there but had it just in case. I have learned and adjusted to my family’s needs and what I personally like to use for supplies. For example, I wouldn’t just slap a Band-Aid on my husband. The adhesive rips his skin when it’s time to remove it. Instead I use a Telfa pad, gauze and vet wrap. I take the time and care to make him happy and comfortable. I like Vet wrap instead of stretch gauze. The stretch gauze gets dirty and slides around and stretches out of shape. The Vet wrap sticks to itself, is still breathable and a bit sturdier for an active person. There are other brands of this, but this is what I prefer.

I’m sure if you ask me next week what’s in there I will have a different answer and, that when writing this today I forgot to mention something. But this isn’t the point, the point is this is what works for our family and should give you a general idea, only you know your family best.

The Large Kit
Our main first aid kit is in the house in a large drawer in the bathroom where everyone knows where it is. Also here are extra supplies for refilling the others. These are things we would need while in the house or close by in the yard. Also in there is a backpack full to just pick up and take with me should I need to.

  • Gauze pads-3″x3″ & 4″x4″
  • Tape- waterproof 2″ & 3″ several rolls of each

  • Butterfly closures-small and large, several boxes
  • Telfa pads- 3″x3″ & 4″x4″
  • Dressings-various sizes, several boxes
  • Mole skin
  • Vet wrap-several rolls-2″ 4″ & 6″ rolls (I buy the standard 6″ and use a bread knife to cut the roll to the size I want, a better size for people). Check the feed or tack shop for these. They have come out with versions for people in a flesh tone color and these are expensive and the rolls are shorter.
  • Antiseptic wipes-individually wrapped
  • Hydrogen peroxide-2 bottles
  • Alcohol-2 bottles and individually wrapped
  • Bacatracine-2 tubes and individual packets
  • Triple Antibiotic Ointment-2 tubes and individual packets
  • Calamine lotion
  • Aloe Vera gel
  • Desitin
  • Sunscreen
  • Tea Tree Oil
  • Ora-gel
  • Bug spray, bottles & individual wipes
  • Antacids-tablets and liquid
  • Tylenol, Advil, cold medication, cough syrup, children’s Tylenol, children’s cough syrup large bottles and individual packets
  • Instant heat and ice packs-3 of each
  • Ace bandages-2 each of small 2″ and large 3″ wide.
  • Thermometers, tweezers, Popsicle sticks, rubber single use gloves, scissors , q-tips & cotton balls.

 

The Backpack
This was designed with the thought I might not have my car or be able to carry the large tote stored in the car. The backpack is portable and in it I have small quantities of the above items. Plus the following:

  • A one week supply of everyone’s prescription medications. Clearly labeled with who it belongs to, the name and dose of the perspiration, the prescribing doctor, the doctor’s phone number, the date it was put into the bottle and a date it needs to be replaced. I replace this every 6 months FAITHFULLY! It is written in my 3 ring binder to remind me.
  • The Barn Kit
    Was designed to care for minor cuts and scrapes and not have to go all the way back to the house. Who wants to stop fencing or putting in hay just to walk back to the house to bandage a small cut?

  • A small amount of cash & change.
  • Pens & Paper
  • Important phone numbers, doctors, family, insurance company, bank, etc. Copies of important documents-birth certificates, deeds, passports, and brief medical history for each family member, etc. I also update this once a year FAITHFULLY it too is written in my 3 ring binder.
  • A deck of playing cards, small pack of crayons
  • Disposable diapers, baby wipes, a travel size sewing kit
  • Travel size toothbrushes, toothpaste, bar soap, dental floss, deodorant, shampoo, conditioner, a hair brush and small mirror.
  • 2 pair of tube socks, these are quite handy. You can cut of the toe and use it to hold bandaging in place, wear them, help divide items within the pack. Use them as a compress, they are cotton and would work well to start a fire.
  • A length of rope, inexpensive rain ponchos, waterproof-strike anywhere matches, can of sterno, metal cups, metal spoons, hunting knife, a Swiss army knife, compass, State and US map, a box-cutting knife, small flashlight, small battery powered radio, extra batteries, plastic bags, trash bags, and a small roll of duck tape.
  • Special medical supplies for each person, blood sugar testing kits, nebulizers, etc.
  • Small amounts of non-perishable food/snacks.

 

 

I have an old metal first aid kit (yup’ the one I bought when I was first married) that screws on the wall and in this I have:

  • Band aids-various sizes
  • Single use rubber gloves
  • Gauze-3×3 &4×4
  • Telfa pads
  • Compression pads
  • Vet wrap
  • Bacatration, Triple Antibiotic Ointment, Antiseptic wipes
  • Sun screen, bug repellent
  • Scissors, tweezers
  • Waterproof tape

The Animals’ Kit

Theirs’ was designed with the same ideas as ours’ were. A large one with everything in quantity to refill the others. This is not so portable and a smaller version that is portable.

The Barn Kit
Again keep in mind our vet is 20 minutes away and available 24 hours a day for barn calls.

This is kept in a large 3-drawer plastic storage bin. The outside of the drawers are clearly labeled First Aid and in there are:

  • Gauze pads-large and small
  • Waterproof tape-several sizes and several rolls
  • Vet Wrap-several rolls and sizes, again I cut some of them to the size I wanted.
  • Cotton rolls, stretch gauze rolls.
  • Stethoscope, thermometers, scissors, tweezers, clean squirt bottles, sterile water.
  • Mouthwash, Betadine, Bacatration, Triple Antibiotic Ointment, Desitin, Blue Kote, Black Drawing Salve, Tee Tree Oil, Lubrication gel, MTG, and Vaseline.
  • Standing wraps
  • Butte tablets, aspirin tubes
  • Clean rags and towels

In the travel backpack I have the same supplies and carry it with me when we trailer the horses. Also extra fly masks, lead ropes, halters, and hobbles.

I also have a zip lock bag with Band-Aids, antiseptic wipes, gauze pads, waterproof tape, bug repellent, sun block, Tylenol, tissues, and a small roll of duck tape. This is kept in my saddlebag for trail rides. You would be surprised how popular you become when you are 5 miles down the trail and run into a swarm of mosquitoes, and you are the only one who thought to bring bug spray for both yourself and your horse.
The Vehicles
Each truck (my truck and my husbands) and my car have a zip top gallon sized bag with supplies in it. It is kept behind the seat.

My car because if needed will fit everyone safely in it has a plastic storage container with larger amounts of the same things as our main kit plus:

 

  • Band-aids-several of each size
  • Disposable rubber gloves
  • Gauze pads-small and large
  • Bacatration, Triple Antibiotic Ointment
  • Tylenol, Ant-acid Tablets
  • A roll of Vet wrap
  • Scissors
  • Waterproof tape

In each glove compartment or the door pockets are:

  • Maps of New England and US
  • Pens and paper
  • Small amount of cash and change
  • Flashlights and extra batteries
  • Plastic bags, duct tape
  • Sun screen and bug spray
  • Paper napkins

The trucks always have extra gloves, jackets, hats, and spare tools.

  • Paper plates, cups, towels, bathroom tissue and plastic utensils.
  • A small amount of non-perishable food, and bottled water and juice boxes that are replaced every 6 months.–Faithfully, this is written in my 3 ring binder.
  • A change of clothes for everyone & an extra pair of shoes-depending on the season coming.
  • Blankets, rain ponchos, hats and gloves.
  • Flashlights, small battery operated radio and spare batteries. (The same size batteries as the flashlights) keep it simple…. This is written in my 3 ring binder to change the batteries once a year.
  • A small tool kit with tools that will fit my car.
  • Copies of important documents- birth certificates, deeds, passports, brief medical history for each family member, etc. I also update this once a year FAITHFULLY it too is written in my 3 ring binder.
  • Disposable diapers, baby wipes, a travel size sewing kit.
    Travel size toothbrushes, toothpaste, bar soap, dental floss, deodorant, shampoo, conditioner, a hairbrush and small mirror.
  • A one week supply of everyone’s prescription medications. Clearly labeled with who it belongs to, the name and dose of the perspiration, the prescribing doctor, the doctor’s phone number, the date it was put into the bottle and a date it needs to be replaced. I replace this every 6 months FAITHFULLY! It is written in my 3 ring binder to remind me. Inside the bottle is a photocopy of the prescriptions.
  • Special medical supplies for each person, blood sugar testing kits, nebulizers, etc.

These aren’t just put together and forgotten about, they are a part of our family and are always changing growing and shrinking according to our needs, and quite often useful for others too. Most everyone knows chances are if I’m around there is a kit near by and it is there for them to use too.

Our “Comfort Kits” work. Many times when the baby is tired in the car, we can open the tote, get her a drink, a blanket even a heat pad to settle her down during the ride. There is no stress where to stop and find the things we need or let her be uncomfortable. Got a headache? No problem, look in the tote. Decide to stop at a little country store and have a picnic? We are ready, buy the chicken from the deli and pull over we have everything we need. Decide unexpectedly to stay at a friend’s house because of bad weather or your tired? No problem, we have clothes, personal care items with us, everyone is comfortable and happy. At the country fair and split your knee open on the trailer hitch (don’t laugh I did this)? no problem, doctor it up and go sooth yourself with a piece of fried dough. No stress–no worry about where the first aid station might be or even if there is one.

I’m not a fanatic about it and don’t panic when I don’t have something, and my Husband teases me that I always pack everything including the kitchen sink. But he is always happy to find what he wants when he needs it. It keeps my family and friends happy and cared for and even helps out a stranger if needed. I like the security of knowing I have planned and have answers for common situations and it keeps my simple life running smoothly and happy.

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Posted on August 18, 2008, in Family, Planning, Tutorials. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I actually seem to go along with everything that ended up being posted
    within “Our First AidComfort Kits Lizzy Lane Farm”.
    Many thanks for all of the actual info.Thanks for your effort-Susan

  2. I actually found this specific blog post , Cheap Window Treatments “Our First AidComfort Kits | Lizzy Lane Farm”, relatively interesting and also the post was in fact a terrific read.
    Thanks for the post-Jack

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